Bryanwere

arkitekcher:

Rotational Horizon Work - Installation (2014)  |  Doug Wheeler

Materials: Reinforced fiberglass, flat white titanium dioxide latex, LED light, and DMX control

An avid flyer since childhood and an eventual pilot himself, Wheeler has long been fascinated by the illusory quality of landscape as glimpsed from the vantage point of an airplane. Approaching an ever-receding horizon, passengers are able to watch the terrain shift rapidly as though it were a stage set laid out flatly in front of them when, in actuality, their flight path traces out the contours of the globe. By mimicking the sensation of the earth’s rotational pull and curvature, Wheeler alters the traditionally static viewing experience of a work of art, thereby destabilizing our innate sense of equilibrium and imparting the feeling of moving with the earth towards an unreachable horizon.”


“Russian Ornaments” Marta Berzkalna by Mariano Vivanco for Vogue Russia April 2011

Russian Ornaments” Marta Berzkalna by Mariano Vivanco for Vogue Russia April 2011


Posy ring with pictogram inscription, ‘Two hands, one heart, Till death us part.’ Made in England in the 17th century (source).

Posy ring with pictogram inscription, ‘Two hands, one heart, Till death us part.’ Made in England in the 17th century (source).

ryanjamesyezak:

This Anna Kendrick Little Mermaid SNL sketch is impossible to find (NBC ran into some legal issues with Disney)… watch while you can!

fcuksihtcnut:

robemmy:

Hypocrisy

Oooo fuck

4himglory:

Fresh Pasta | Three Little Halves

applecocaine:

Henri Privat-Livemont (by hauk sven)

applecocaine:

Henri Privat-Livemont (by hauk sven)

ianbrooks:

The End of the Pier photos by Finn Hopson

"The slow demise of Brighton’s West Pier.

 The final section of the UK’s only grade II listed pier, photographed during some of the lowest tides of the year from 2012 until the present day. An ongoing project that will end once its finally disappeared into the sea. As seems appropriate for a project concerning the slow passing of time each image is shot as a very long exposure, varying from about 30 seconds to 4 minutes, isolating the details of this grand old structure in the water, and highlighting what’s no longer there. “

Prints available at finnhopson.com

Artist: Behance / Blog